Find People, Find Phone Numbers, Find Addresses, Find Buisnesses, Your #1 Trace tool & collection agency guide My skip assist
People Finding websites
Finding people using google, google tricks,
Consumer protection websites canada
Make Collection Agency's Stop Calling You
Collection agency rules Alberta
Collection Agency Rules British Columbia
Collection Agency Rules Saskatchewan
Collection agency rules Manitoba
Collection Agency Rules Ontario
Collection Agency Rules Quebec
QUEBEC CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT PAGE 2
Collection Agency Rules PEI
Collection Agency Rules Newfoundland & Labrador
Collection agency rules Nunavut
Collection Agency Rules Northwest territories
Collection agency rules in Yukon Territories
Government Of Canada Everything You need to know about credit Page 1
Government Of Canada Everything you need to know about credit Page 2
Goverment of canada everything you need to know about credit page 3
United States Collection Agency Rules
Collection agency rules state of Alabama
Collection Agency Rules Alaska
VIDEO PAGE - VIDEO GUIDE TO STOPPING COLLECTOR CALLS YOUR CREDIT AND MORE
How to file a collection agency complaint and all the collection agency rules.
All your options from bankrupcy to credit counsellors and everything inbetween
List of all trustees in Canada
Canadian Consumer Handbook Collection Agencies
Canadian Consumer Handbook Contracts
Canadian Consumer Handbook Credit Reporting
Canadian Consumer Handbook Debit Card Fraud
Canadian Consumer Handbook Debt
Canadian Consumer Handbook Financial Services
Canadian Consumer Handbook Mortgages
Canadian Consumer Handbook Payday Lending
Build Your Buying Skills From OCA
Spending Smarter Tools from OCA
Take Charge of Your Debt from OCA
Cellphones from OCA
Learn About the Retail Market from OCA
Protect Your Privacy from OCA
Get a Mortgage, Mortgage Refinanace, Second Mortgage, Equity Loan
Mortgage Basics- What you need to know
How credit effects your mortgage
Guestbook
ALL Collection Agency's in Canada page 1
ALL Collection Agency's in Canada Page 2
ALL Collection Agencys in Canada page 3
ALL Collection Agency's in Canada Page 4
ALL Collection Agency's in Canada Page 5
My Skip Assist Find anyone, person search, phone number search, business search, collection agency tools, repossession search, court baliff search
Skip tools for collection agencys, repossessions, court balif tools, Person search, Phone number search, Address search, Business search

Collection agency rules Alberta

 
Filing a Complaint

The first step in any complaint process is to talk with one of our Information Officers in the Consumer Contact Centre at 780-427-4088 in Edmonton and toll-free at 1-877-427-4088 throughout the rest of the province. If they recommend that you file a formal complaint, complete the on-line form or the printable complaint form (pdf).

You can also refer to our "Filing a Complaint with Consumer Services" infosheet.

Please be sure to fill out the entire form.If you have copies of documents to support your claim, we recommend you print the form and send it with a copy of your supporting documents to the address below depending on which part of the province you reside in. Please do not include in the on-line complaint form any personal information like your bank account number, charge card or social insurance number. If you must include that information in your complaint, please send it to us by Canada Post mail instead.

Note: The information being collected on the complaint forms is for the purpose of a possible complaint investigation in accordance with the Cemeteries Act, the Charitable Fund Raising Act, the Fair Trading Act or the Government Organization Act (in relation to Residential Tenancies and Mobile Home Sites Tenancies investigations). When necessary, the information provided may be disclosed to law enforcement agencies or in connection with legal proceedings.  

Questions about the collection of this information can be directed to the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Coordinator for Service Alberta, Box 3140, Edmonton, Alberta T5J 2G7, (1-877-427-4088).

Mailing Address

If you have a 780 area code:

Service Alberta
Investigation Services - North
3rd Floor, Commerce Place
10155 – 102 Street
Edmonton AB T5J 4L4
Fax: 780-422-9106 


If you have a 403 area code:

Service Alberta
Investigation Services - South
301, 7015 MacLeod Trail S
Calgary AB T2H 2K6
Fax: 403-297-4270

More Information

For further assistance with this topic, please contact the Consumer Contact Centre at 780-427-4088 (Edmonton and area) or 1-877-427-4088 (toll-free in Alberta).

CONTENTS

Page

COLLECTION AGENCIES

  

2

 

DEBT REPAYMENT

AGENCIES

4

CONTRACT

REQUIREMENTS

5

MONEY MENTORS

6

RECORDS

6

GENERAL INFORMATION

7

MAINTENANCE ENFORCEMENT

PROGRAM

7

FOR MORE INFORMATION

8

Collection agencies collect unpaid debts or locate debtors for

others. Debt repayment agencies charge a fee to negotiate payment

arrangements for people who owe money.

The Fair Trading Act and the Collection and Debt Repayment Practices

Regulation identify the rules these businesses and the people working

for them must follow.

ABOUT THE LEGISLATION

Alberta requires all collection agencies, collectors, debt repayment

agencies and debt repayment agents to be licensed under the Fair

Trading Act and the Collection and Debt Repayment Practices

Regulation. All locations at which collection or debt repayment activity

occurs must be registered on the licence. The agencies are responsible

for the behaviour of the collectors or agents they employ.

The legislation does not apply to businesses or people collecting debts

for which they are the original creditor or owner of the debt, a lawyer

who is collecting a debt for a client, a civil enforcement bailiff or agency

while seizing security or people working in the regular course of their

employment while licensed under the Insurance Act. The Fair Trading Act

and the Collection and Debt Repayment Practices Regulation can be viewed on the Service Alberta website at www.servicealberta.ca under Consumer Information/Legislation.

This publication is intended to provide

general information only and is not a

substitute for legal advice.

 

 
Bill Collection and

Debt Repayment

If you are having problems

paying your bills, contact your

creditors as soon as possible.

CONSUMER TIPS

2

CONSUMER TIPS

COLLECTION AGENCIES

If you are having problems paying your bills, contact your creditors as soon as possible. Try to make arrangements with your creditors before your account

is turned over to a collection agency. A collection agency or collector must:

Use the name that is shown on their licence in all contacts and correspondence related to their collection activities.

Provide you with information about the original creditor and current creditor of the debt and any details of the debt.

Disclose in writing the fee the agency will charge for a non-sufficient funds

(NSF) cheque before the submission of the cheque.

Provide a receipt for all cash transactions and payments made in person or at your request.

Give you an account of the debt if you ask for it. The accounting must include details of the debt. Agencies only have to give you this information once every six months. If the agency cannot provide the accounting, they must cease

collection activity until they can.A collector may:

Contact you at home between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m.

Alberta time.

Contact your spouse, adult interdependent partner, relative, neighbour, friend or acquaintance to obtain your residential address, personal or employment telephone number.

Contact you at work to discuss your debt unless you ask them not to. If you don’t want to be contacted at work, you must make other arrangements to discuss the debt and you must keep those arrangements.

Contact your employer on one occasion to confirm your

Employment status, business title and the address of the business in preparation for legal proceedings.

Alberta requires all collection agencies,

collectors and debt repayment agencies

to be licensed.

Bill Collection and Debt Repayment

3

CONSUMER TIPS

A collector may not:

• Call you or members of your household, relatives, friends, neighbours or your employer so often that the number of calls received could be considered harassment.

Use threatening, profane, intimidating or coercive language.

Give any false or misleading information including references to the police

Or a law firm, credit history, court proceedings, lien or garnishment or

imply that the collector or agency is part of a law firm or legal department

of the collection agency or client.

Threaten or state an intention to proceed with any legal action where the agency does not have the legal authority and consent of the creditor to do

so.

Discuss your debt or the existence of your debt with any person except you

(unless you have given your express consent to do so), a guarantor

of the debt, the creditor or someone you have identified in writing

as your representative. If you want the collector to contact your representative

to discuss your debt, you must provide that person’s current address and telephone number.

Discuss your debt with a minor child.

Continue to contact you if you inform the agency in writing or any other

Verifiable means that the debt is in dispute and that you wish the creditor to

take you to court.

Continue to contact you if you tell the collector that you are not the debtor unless after investigation, the agency is convinced you are the  debtor.

Cancel or alter a repayment arrangement if you have complied with the terms of the arrangement and have not misrepresented your financial circumstances or they have not materially changed.

Make more than three unsolicited contacts in any period of seven consecutive days not including contacts with a third party to locate you or mistaken contacts with a third party or contacts by traditional mail.

Pursue a non-judgment debt where the last payment or written acknowledgement of the debt is more than six years old. Other

A collector may not suggest that a friend, spouse or other relative is responsible for your debt or ask that person for money unless he or she has

Accepted responsibility (for example, if he or she co-signed a loan).

A collector may not threaten to physically harm you, your family or your property. If any collector does this, charges may be laid under the

Criminal Code of Canada

.

If this happens, call the police and inform Service Alberta.

4

CONSUMER TIPS

Collection agencies do not have the authority to take your property if you do not pay your bill. However, if the agency sues you and obtains

a judgment, they may hire a civil enforcement agency to seize your property. A bailiff who works for a civil enforcement agency is the only person

who can seize property.

Collection agencies cannot bring in the police or send you to jail. The police do not become involved in debt collection matters. DEBT REPAYMENT AGENCIES A debt repayment agency is a business that charges a fee to act for you in negotiating or making arrangements with creditors for you to pay what you owe. This is a voluntary agreement between the debt repayment

Agency (acting for you) and your creditors. A creditor does not have to accept your payment proposal. Even if a creditor accepts your payment proposal, it can be cancelled if you do not abide by all the terms of the agreement. The creditor can then resume collection activity on your debt. The agency must tell you within 30 days of being informed by a creditor that the creditor has decided not to participate in or has withdrawn from a debt repayment program. A debt repayment agency can charge you a one-time administration fee. If your repayment agreement includes a schedule of payments to your creditors, the administration fee cannot be more than the average monthly payment that is set out in the agreement. The agency can also charge 15 per cent of the gross amount of the payments received from you for distribution to your creditors. If the debt repayment agency successfully negotiates a settlement of a one-time payment with your creditors that is acceptable to you, the agency is allowed to charge a single fee of no more than 10 per cent of the debt owed. A debt repayment agency must give you a signed copy of your contract before providing any services. If the agency fails to do this, it cannot charge you any fees, commissions or disbursement costs for the

services.

Collection agencies do not have the authority to take your property if you do not pay your bill.

Bill Collection and Debt Repayment

5

CONSUMER TIPS

CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS

A debt repayment contract must:

Be in writing, dated and signed by you and the debt repayment agency.

Include your name, address and telephone number and the name, address, telephone number and if available the fax and e-mail address of the debt repayment agency.

Describe all the services that will be provided.

Itemize all the fees you are required to pay.

List all creditors that will be paid under the agreement.

State the total amount you owe, the amount of each payment, the schedule of payments and the total number of payments for each creditor. A debt repayment agent or agency may not:

Charge any fee for an NSF cheque unless the agency has disclosed in writing prior to the submission of the cheque that a fee will be charged.

Make any arrangement with you to accept a sum of money that is less than the amount of the balance that is due and owing to a creditor as a final

Settlement without the prior express consent of the creditor.

Give any false or misleading information including References to the police or law firm, credit history, court proceedings, lien or garnishment.

Lend you money to pay your debts.

Offer to pay or give you any other form of compensation for entering into a debt repayment agreement.

Collect any fee for referring or assisting you to obtain an extension of credit from a lender, creditor or service provider.

Fail to provide a receipt for all cash transactions or payments made in person or at your request.

Discuss your debt or the existence of your debt with any person except you, a guarantor of the debt, your representative or the creditor of the debt.

Make a claim for breach of contract if you cancel the repayment agreement.

6

CONSUMER TIPS

MONEY MENTORS

Money Mentors

Is a not-for-profit consumer debt counselling service that offers a number of debt repayment options. It is the only organization in Alberta legislated to provide the Orderly Payment of Debts (OPD) program.

Under the OPD program, Money Mentors makes an application to the court on your behalf for a consolidation order. This order will allow you to make

payments, which Money Mentors will distribute prorated to your unsecured creditors. A consolidation order protects you from some legal actions. The

interest rate is reduced to five per cent. Payment schedules are based on your ability to pay. Most secured credit (such as property mortgages or car loans)

cannot go on OPD. If you choose to go on the program, you can maintain secured credit payments outside of the OPD program, but you cannot get any

new credit. If you default while on OPD, the court will make an order permitting all registered creditors to proceed independently to enforce their claims. They do not have to sue you to proceed with legal action to collect

the debt. For more information on the OPD program contact

Money Mentors Toll-free in Alberta - 1-888-294-0076

or visit their website at

www.moneymentors.ca

.

RECORDS

Collection and debt repayment agencies must create and maintain records of all their activities relating to collection or debt repayment. This includes, but is not limited to:

Contacts with creditors and debtors

Receipts and disbursements

Trust accounts

Telephone calls

Agreements

Authorizations from creditors to sue or accept a settlement on a debt

All correspondence

History of a debt and negotiations with creditors Records must be retained for a minimum of three years after the date the record was made. Keep your own records of how much you have paid on your debts, who you paid, when you

made payments, the form of payment you used (cash, cheque, debit card, money order, etc.), who you talked to about your debt and any payment

arrangements you agreed to. Make sure you are able to verify (by receipts,

cancelled cheques, etc.) any payment you made to an agency or creditor.

Bill Collection and Debt Repayment

7

CONSUMER TIPS

GENERAL INFORMATION

Creditors may take action to seize your property through a civil enforcement agency without the need for a judgment if:

You have bought items through a time sales agreement and you are behind or have not made any payments.

The creditor is secured by a chattel mortgage and you have payment arrears.

The debt is rent owed to a landlord.

MAINTENANCE ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM

When a court order or agreement for child or spousal

support registered with the Alberta Maintenance Enforcement

Program (MEP) is in arrears, MEP is required to pursue collection.

MEP has a number of collection tools that may be used if maintenance is not paid in full and on time, including:

Restricting motor vehicle services (such as driver’s licence renewals, abstracts and vehicle registrations),

placing liens on personal property, and

attaching money from wages or bank accounts. To avoid collection action, default penalties and interest, it is always advisable for debtors to establish

payment arrangements with MEP that address current maintenance obligations and any arrears. If a debtor cannot make their payment for whatever reason, they are encouraged to contact MEP as soon

as possible. Clients can access the Client Services Centre by

calling 780-422-5555 in Edmonton or 310-0000 for toll-free access anywhere in Alberta. Clients can also view their file online by visiting MEP Accounts Online at https://justice.alberta.ca/

programs_services/mep/Pages/accounts.aspx

.

Clients should have their seven digit MEP account number and

Personal Identification Number (PIN)

Available when using the internet service or calling.

Keep your own

records of how

much you have

paid on your

debts.

8

CONSUMER TIPS

06/12

FOR MORE INFORMATION

For more information about bill collection and debt repayment contact

Consumer Contact Centre

Edmonton: 780-427-4088

Toll-free in Alberta: 1-877-427-4088

www.servicealberta.ca

Publications

www.servicealberta.ca>Consumer Information>Tipsheets-Consumer

Information

The publication

What Creditors Can Do if You Don’t Pay

has information

about the legal steps creditors must take to collect a debt.

Queen’s Printer Bookstore

You may purchase

Acts and regulations from the Queen’s Printer

Bookstore:

10611 - 98 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T5K 2P7

Edmonton

: 780

-

427-4952

Toll-free in Alberta: 310-0000 then 780-427-4952

These are also free for you to download in the “pdf” or “html” formats at

www.qp.alberta.ca

A current version of this and other consumer publications are available at

the Service Alberta website www.servicealberta.ca. Most public libraries

have Internet access if you don’t have access at home.

If you need more copies of this publication, you have permission to

photocopy.

 

CONSUMER TIPS

2

CONSUMER TIPS

In some cases, the court may also allow the creditor

to garnishee your wages and your bank account.

Note

: Legal costs can be very expensive. Talk to

your creditors or their representative to see if you

can negotiate new payment arrangements and stop

legal action. Ensure any agreement you negotiate

is in writing and signed by both parties.

Seizure under a secured contract

A creditor must use a civil enforcement agency to

seize the security. A civil enforcement bailiff, working

with the agency will carry out the seizure.

You will have a chance to get your security back. The

creditor must give you 20 days notice before selling

your security. To get it back, you will have to pay the

money you owe from the missed payments, as well as

the administrative costs of the seizure. You may also

have to pay the full amount of the debt. If you cannot

pay, the creditor has the right to sell the security.

Note

: Seizure under a secured credit contract is

not the same as seizure under an unsecured credit

contract. For more information refer to “Seizure

under a writ of enforcement”.

Conditional sales contracts

A conditional sales contract is a special type of

secured contract. When you buy goods under a

conditional sales contract the creditor owns the

goods until you pay the debt in full. The goods are

the security for the contract. For example if you buy a

car from a car dealership and sign a conditional sales

contract you can drive the car off the lot immediately,

but the car is the security and you are not really the

owner until you make your last payment. If you don’t

make your payments, the dealer may seize the car.

With a conditional sales contract, if you don’t make

your payments as agreed, the creditor may either

seize the goods that you bought on the conditional

sales contract, or sue you to get a judgement for the

amount that you owe.

Quit claims

If you don’t make your payments the creditor may

ask you to sign a quit claim in which you agree to

voluntarily give the security back to the creditor. If you

do this there is no need for the creditor to use a civil

enforcement agency (bailiff) to seize the security.

Note

: If the creditor sells the security but does not

receive enough money to pay your debt in full, you

could still be responsible for the balance. You have

no guarantee that the creditor will sell the security

for more than what you owe. If the creditor sells

the security and receives more than the balance of

your debt the difference must be paid to you.

uNSeCured Credit CoNtraCtS

With an unsecured credit agreement, you get

credit without promising security to the creditor. For

example, you sign an unsecured credit contract when

you get a credit card or a payday loan. You have an

unsecured credit agreement with the utility company

when they connect your gas, power, water or phone.

You also have an unsecured agreement with your

dentist for dental care.

Unsecured creditors can sue you if you don’t pay your

bills.

3

CONSUMER TIPS

Note

: If you don’t pay your utility bill, the utility

company will probably cut off your services and

start legal action to get the money you owe. To

have the service reconnected, you will have to pay

your outstanding debt, a late penalty, a hook-up fee

and a deposit.

i

f a

Creditor SueS You

A creditor has the option of suing you in the Civil

Division of Provincial Court (formerly known as small

claims court) or the Court of Queen’s Bench.

Civil division of Provincial Court

If your debt is $50,000 or less, your case will probably

be heard in this court. You may hire a lawyer to

represent you or you may represent yourself.

If you are sued you will be served with a civil claim.

The creditor (or a representative of the creditor)

will serve the claim on you where you usually live.

It can also be served on any adult resident in your

household that is at least 16 years of age. The claim

can also be sent by registered mail. The claim will tell

you who is suing you, why they are suing, and how

much money they are suing you for.

Don’t ignore the claim. If you do not take any action

your creditor can get a default judgement from the

court that would allow them to garnishee your wages,

bank account or have your property seized.

What you can do:

1.

talk to your creditor.

You might be able to negotiate a payment plan

you can handle and to which your creditor will

agree. Make sure any agreement you negotiate is

in writing and signed by both parties. The creditor

should immediately inform the Civil Division of

Provincial Court in writing that the matter has

been settled.

2.

Pay the claim.

You can pay the claim and related costs to

the court, or directly to the creditor or his

representative. Make sure you get a receipt.

The court will only accept payment by cash,

certified cheque, money order or debit card where

available. You will not have to appear before a

judge if you choose this action.

3.

f

ile a dispute note.

You will receive a form called a dispute note when

you receive your civil claim. If you believe there

are facts in your favour and you want to object to

the creditor’s claim, you can complete the dispute

note and deliver it personally, by fax, or by mail

to the Court office where the civil claim was filed.

Lack of money is not a valid reason to dispute the

claim. If you receive a civil claim in Alberta, you have 20

calendar days from the time you are served to file the

dispute note. If the claim is served on you outside

Alberta you will have one month to respond. The

Court office must receive the dispute note within the

correct time limit. Once the note is filed, the clerk of

the court will let you and the creditor know when the

hearing will be. At the hearing a judge will decide if the

creditor has a valid claim. If you don’t file a valid dispute

note within the required time or appear in court on the day

of the hearing, the court will award the creditor with a

judgement against you.

If you are sued you

will be served with

a civil claim. Don’t

ignore the claim.

4

CONSUMER TIPS

Court of Queen’s bench

If your debt is $50,000 or more the case will be heard

in the Court of Queen’s Bench. The creditor or a

representative of the creditor will deliver a statement

of claim to you in person, or by registered mail. You

have 20 calendar days to respond. Because of the

large amount of money involved you should consult a

lawyer.

eNforCemeNt of JudgemeNtS

The court will award a judgement to a creditor if the

judge decides that the creditor’s claim is valid. This

judgement is enforceable for 10 years and it can be

renewed. Interest is charged on an unpaid judgement.

It is calculated from the date of the judgement. While

a judgement issued in an Alberta court can only

be enforced in Alberta, a creditor may transfer the

judgement to other provinces. So even if you move to

another province, a creditor can pursue you to collect

a judgement debt.

Once a judgement is granted the creditor can take

several steps to get the money that you owe:

1.

Register a writ of enforcement with the

Personal Property Registry.

2.

Garnishee your wages, bank accounts or

accounts receivable.

3.

Seize your property.

Writ of enforcement

To start enforcement procedures the creditor must file

a writ of enforcement with the Court of Queen’s Bench

and then register it in the Personal Property Registry.

If several creditors have judgements against you,

each one may file a writ. If one creditor seizes your

property, or garnishees your wages or bank account,

all creditors with writs against you will receive a share

of the money from the seizure or the garnishment.

If you own a house or land, a creditor with a

judgement against you can file a writ of enforcement

against the title to your property at the Land Titles

Office. You will have difficulty selling or mortgaging

your property until the judgement is settled.

Seizure under a writ of enforcement

After registering a writ of enforcement, a creditor must

use a civil enforcement agency to seize your personal

property to pay the judgement debt plus interest and

costs. The civil enforcement bailiff can seize personal

property such as vehicles and furniture. However,

there are certain belongings that the bailiff cannot

seize under a writ of enforcement. (See “What cannot

be seized”.)

When the bailiff seizes your property you will be given

a copy of the Notice of Seizure, a Notice of Objection

and a form called Information for Debtor. The bailiff

may remove the seized property or leave it with you

under an arrangement called a baillee’s undertaking.

If the property is left with you it is under the condition

that you agree not to sell, remove or damage it.

After the bailiff gives you the seizure documents, you

have 15 calendar days to give a notice of objection

to the civil enforcement agency that conducted the

seizure. The notice must give the reasons for your

objection. Your property then cannot be sold without

a court order. You will be notified of the court date for

hearing your objection. If you don’t file an objection,

or make arrangements to pay your debt, the creditor

may instruct the civil enforcement agency to sell the

seized property by any commercially reasonable

method.

5

CONSUMER TIPS

Can you stop a seizure?

Talk to your creditor immediately. If you can start

paying some of the money that you owe, the creditor

may leave the seized property with you. You and the

creditor may agree to a new payment plan. If you

can’t agree, the creditor will probably continue with

the seizure. Most creditors want to collect the money

that you owe them as quickly as possible, so would

rather not take legal action.

What cannot be seized

Under Alberta’s

Civil Enforcement Act,

you have the

right to keep certain property. In most cases, you

may keep

household furnishings and appliances worth up to

$4,000

a motor vehicle up to a value of $5,000

personal property that you need to earn your

livelihood, up to a value of $10,000

up to $40,000 of the equity on the title of the

house that you own and live in (equity is the

difference between the market value of your home

and any outstanding mortgages). If the equity

is more than $40,000, the creditor can move to

sell the house. You would then be allowed to

keep up to $40,000 of any money left after the

mortgage is paid in full. This $40,000 is reduced

proportionately where the title to the property is

held jointly (e.g. in the case of two joint tenants,

the exemption for each is $20,000).

Note

: If you promised any specific items as

security on a loan or have a conditional sales

contract, those items can be seized if you do not

make your loan payments. The amounts listed

above do not apply.

garNiShmeNt

Garnishment is a legal procedure that a creditor can

take after the court awards a judgement against

you. The creditor asks the court to take the money

(garnishee) you owe from a number of sources like

your pay cheque

your account at a financial institution such as a

bank, treasury branch, trust company or credit

union

accounts receivable (money owing to you by

others).

The creditor delivers the garnishee summons to your

employer or financial institution. The creditor can

garnishee your wages or money in your bank account,

up to the amount of your total judgement debt plus

costs. Your employer or financial institution pays the

money to the court and the court pays the money to

the creditors.

If there is not enough money available to cover your

debt on the day the garnishee summons is served

the creditor will continue to garnishee your wages or

accounts until your debt is paid in full.

A garnishee summons is effective for 60 days against

a bank account, and is effective for one year in most

other cases. The garnishee must be renewed at that

time.

Your employer, financial institution or creditor will give

you a copy of the garnishee summons within 15 days

of the date it is served.

Wage garnishment

If your wages are garnisheed, you will be allowed to

keep a certain amount of money each month to pay

for your basic expenses:

6

CONSUMER TIPS

For a debtor with no dependents, the minimum

exemption is $800 net per month and the

maximum is $2,400 net. Creditors can take one-

half the amount between the $800 minimum

exemption and the $2,400 maximum exemption

and 100 percent of employment earnings greater

than $2,400.

For a debtor with one or more dependents, the

minimum and maximum exemptions both increase

by $200 for each dependent.

These amounts are calculated from total earnings less

income tax, Canada Pension Plan contributions and

Employment Insurance contributions.

Note

: The

Fair Trading Act

prohibits the assignment of wages to a creditor from an

employer. Your employer must pay you the full

amount of your owed wages, then you have control

over the use of those wages. A creditor that

attempts to induce a person or employer to enter

into a wage assignment may be in breach of the

legislation.

If your debt is for unpaid child support or alimony

under a court order, you will not be allowed to keep

these amounts. Clients can call the Alberta Justice

Maintenance Enforcement Program (MEP) Info Line

by calling 780-422-5555 in Edmonton or dial

310-0000 for toll-free access anywhere in Alberta.

Clients should have their seven digit MEP account

number and Personal Identification Number (PIN)

available when using the Internet service or calling.

b

ank account garnishment

A creditor who garnishees your bank account is

allowed to take the entire amount of money that you

owe. This means that all money you have on deposit

at your financial institution can be taken. The creditor

does not have to leave you anything.

Joint accounts can be garnisheed. The money

taken from this type of account will be pro-rated by

the court based on the number of account holders.

Garnishment of a joint account is only valid for one

garnishee. The creditor will have to re-issue the

garnishee if they want to continue to garnishee the

joint account.

If your employer deposits your wages directly into

your bank account, that money is considered to be

a bank deposit. It can all be garnisheed. If you are

in this situation you can apply to the Court for an

order that will grant you the same exemptions you

would have been entitled to if the garnishee had been

served on your employer.

Special rules apply if the only money kept in a bank

account is from income support payments under the

Income and Employment Supports Act,

a handicap

benefit paid under the

Assured Income for the

Severely Handicapped Act, or a widow’s pension

under the Widows’ Pension Act.

Your bank account cannot be garnisheed if the only money

 in the account is from one of these types of payments.

If you deposit other money in this account it could be garnisheed.

objection to a garnishment

To stop the garnishment process or to make changes

to the garnishment by the creditor, you must obtain a

court order. You will probably need a lawyer to do so.

doYou oWe money to a baNk?

If you have an overdue debt owing to a bank, the

bank can use its right of set-off to recover the money.

The right of set-off allows a bank to withdraw money

from your accounts to pay your overdue debt. The

bank does not have to give you notice or ask your

permission before taking this action. The bank does

not have to ask the permission of the court.

7

CONSUMER TIPS

Banks may use their right of set-off to collect overdue

payments on credit cards, loans, overdrafts or lines

of credit. A bank may withdraw money that you have

on deposit in any of its branches and apply it to your

debt. The bank does not have to leave any money in

your account.

after Your JudgemeNt iS Paid

Once you have paid a judgement in full, the

judgement should be discharged at the Court of

Queen’s Bench and at the Personal Property Registry.

Check to make sure this is done. It’s also a good idea

to let the credit bureau know that you have paid the

debt. They will enter this information on your credit

record.

For more information refer to the Service Alberta

publication Your Credit Report.

www.servicealberta.ca>Consumer Information>

Tipsheets-Consumer Information>Your Credit Report.

Phone: Edmonton 780-427-4088

Toll-free in Alberta: 1-877-427-4088

Judgements are recorded on your credit file. The

information will remain on your file for six years after

the judgement has been paid in full. Businesses

may not be willing to give you credit if you have a

judgement on your record.

debt CouNSelliNg

Money Mentors, formerly Credit Conselling Services

of Alberta, is a not-for-profit consumer debt

counselling service that offers a number of debt

repayment options.

Money Mentors is the only organization in Alberta

legislated to provide the Orderly Payment of Debts

(OPD) program.

Under the OPD program, Money Mentors makes

an application on your behalf, to the court, for a

consolidation order. This order will allow you to make

payments, which Money Mentors will distribute pro

rata to your unsecured creditors. A consolidation order

protects you from some legal actions. The interest

rate is reduced to 5%. Payment schedules are based

on your ability to pay. Most secured credit (such as

property mortgages or car loans) cannot go on OPD.

If you choose to go on the program, you can maintain

secured credit payments outside of the OPD program,

but you cannot get any new credit while on OPD.

If you default while on OPD, the court will make an

order permitting all registered creditors to proceed

independently to enforce their claims. They do not

have to sue the debtor to proceed with legal action to

collect the debt.

legal helP

If a creditor is taking legal action against you, you may

want legal advice. The following agencies can help.

Calgary

legal guidance

gives legal advice and

assistance to people with low incomes who do not

qualify for Legal Aid. Phone 403-234-9266 in Calgary.

dial-a-law

offers brief taped explanations of various

aspects of the law. In Calgary, call 403-234-9022.

Elsewhere in Alberta, call toll-free 1-800-332-1091.

lawyer referral Service

is a province-wide service

for people who can afford to pay a lawyer but need

help finding one who can meet their particular needs.

The service, operated by the Law Society of Alberta,

provides you with the names of three lawyers in your

area. You can make an appointment with one of them

and receive an initial half-hour consultation at no cost.

In Calgary, call 403-228-1722. Elsewhere in Alberta,

call toll-free 1-800-661-1095.

8

CONSUMER TIPS

A current version of this and other consumer publications are available at the Service Alberta

website www.servicealberta.ca. Most public libraries have Internet access if you don’t have access

at home. If you need more copies of this publication, you have permission to photocopy.

legal aid Society of alberta

provides legal help to

people who cannot afford a lawyer. The Society has

offices in Calgary, Edmonton, Fort McMurray, Grande

Prairie, Whitecourt, Lethbridge, Medicine Hat, Peace

River, Red Deer, St. Paul and Wetaskiwin.

Student legal assistance

at the University of

Calgary offers legal help to people with low incomes.

Phone 403-220-6637 in Calgary.

Student

legal Services

at the University of Alberta

offers legal help to people with low incomes. In

Edmonton phone 780-492-2226.

07/14

for more iNformatioN

Consumer Contact Centre

In Edmonton 780-427-4088

Toll-free in Alberta 1-877-427-4088

www.servicealberta.ca

Queen’s Printer

bookstore

You may purchase Act(s) and regulation(s) from the

Queen’s Printer Bookstore:

10611 - 98 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T5K 2P7

Edmonton: 780-427-4952

Toll-free in Alberta: Dial 310-0000 then 780-427-4952

These are also free for you to download in the “pdf” or

“html” formats at

www.qp.alberta.ca

money

mentors -

oPd Program

Money Mentors provides credit counselling and

money coaching.

Toll-free in Alberta: 1-888-294-0076

www.moneymentors.ca

You may also find these publications helpful:

Bill Collection and Debt Repayment

has

information about debt programs and options.

Payday Lending

has information about payday

loans.

Find these on our website at www.servicealberta.

ca>Consumer Information>Tipsheets-Consumer

Information

 

 



Contents

Credit and Personal Reporting

Dealing With Bill Collection Agencies

What Can Happen if  You do not Pay Your Debts

How Can Student Legal Services Help With Credit Issues

Referral Numbers

 

Credit and Personal Reporting

1. What is a credit file?

Your credit file contains information that lenders can look at to help decide if they will extend credit to you. The information contained in it pertains to your employment history,
income, marital status, debt payment history and assets. The reporting agency/credit agency is a private company that keeps files on individuals who apply for credit. These agencies
are required to ensure that the information is correct and fair and must be based on reliable sources.

 

Agencies are prohibited from reporting such things as health care history, any negative information about a debt where the last activity was more than 6 years prior, judgements
more than 6 years ago unless there is confirmation that the debt has not yet been paid, a bankruptcy discharged more than 6 years ago, family details other than the name and
age of your spouse, your race, creed, colour, ancestry, ethnic origin, sexual orientation, religion or political affiliation. There are additional pieces of information that cannot appear
on your credit file. If you believe that there is information there that should not be there, you can check with Alberta Government Services or Credit Counselling Services.

 

2. How do I know what is in my file?

You have the right to find out what is in your file. You will need to show proof of identification in order to get a copy of your credit file. If you do not provide the proper identification,
the credit agency does not have to provide any information to you.

 

Your file will contain all information that is in your file as of the date you requested it, it will explain where the information came from if it is not obvious and it will show you who has
requested the information in the past 6 months.

 

Your credit file will be provided to you for free by mail. If you request the document on the internet and want to see it immediately, they will charge a fee for the service.

 

3. How can I correct this information?

If there is information in your file that you disagree with or is incorrect, you have the right to explain or protest the information. In order to explain or add information
to your file, you can submit a predetermined number of words to the reporting agency. They are required to include this in your file and report it when your credit is
requested. Each reporting agency allows a different number of characters or words. As well, if you submit it to one agency the information is not shared with the others.
You are required to report the correction to each reporting agency separately.

 

If there is something in your report that you believe to be incorrect, you can write a statement to the reporting agency. They will investigate the accuracy of the statement .
Within 90 days they are required to confirm, correct, delete or add to the information. If this occurs they are also required to send an amended copy of your credit report to
anyone who has received it in the past 6 months. Again, you should ensure that all of the different reporting agencies are made aware of the inaccuracy as they do not share
information between them.

 

4. Who has access to this information?

Your credit file can only be viewed by someone who has received permission from you or has advised you that they will be reviewing your file. They must have a legitimate
business reason for requesting the information. When you apply for credit you often fill out an application form and included in this is a written consent for them to obtain your credit information.

 

Each time your credit file is requested, that request is listed on your file. You can check your credit file periodically to see who is accessing the information. In Canada, the
reporting agencies are Equifax Canada, Northern Credit Bureaus and Trans Union of Canada.

^TOP^

 Dealing With Bill Collection Agencies

1. General Information

If you do not pay your bills, often the business you are dealing with will send your outstanding debt to a collection agency. A collection agency works on their behalf to collect the debt.
The collection agency can only collect debts when they have received authorization from the creditor you have been dealing with.

 

2. Who is required to follow the rules pertaining to collection agencies?

Two sets of rules govern who the rules apply to. Companies that are in the business of collecting debts and people that work for them are required to be licenced.
This protects borrowers from abusive practices by collection companies.

 

Companies that collect debts for themselves or lawyers that collect debts for a client are not required to be licenced. Agencies and people authorized by the
Insurance Act and civil enforcement bailiffs are not required to be licenced.

 

3. What collection agencies can and cannot do?

There are strict rules as to when, how often and where collection agencies are allowed to contact you. They can contact you at home or at work in order to try to
collect the outstanding debt. They can only phone between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. If you have requested that they not contact you at work, they cannot continue to do
so but you must make alternate arrangements for them to contact you and you must ensure that they are able to contact you at that number.

 

The collection agency cannot call you so often that it could be considered harassment. They are not able to speak to anyone about the debt except for those directly involved -
namely you and the creditor. Your friends, relatives, employer and neighbors can not be contacted unless it is to verify employment or to get your address or phone number.

 

If you have explained to the agency that you are not the person who owes the debt, they are required to investigate the matter and cannot contact you until they are
convinced you are the person who owes the debt.

 

Unless the creditor (the person you originally owed the debt to) agrees, the collection agency cannot take you to court for the debt.

 

If you request a statement of account, the collection agency is required to give you a copy. However, the agency is only required to give this information to you every 6 months.

 

If you think that the collection agency you are dealing with is not complying with the rules as stated in the Fair Trading Act you can make a complaint to the
Consumer Services Branch of Alberta Government Services. If a collection agency does not follow the Act they can be fined or have their licence suspended or canceled.

 

4. How can I protect myself?

If you owe a debt and are still dealing with the original creditor and not a collection agency try to make arrangements for payments with them before they turn
your file over to a collection agency. Let them know that you are having problems paying the bills so that you can make arrangements with them.

 

If you owe a debt and you are dealing with a collection agency, keep track of what you have paid and when. Make your payments in a form that allows you to keep
track of your payments, such as money orders or cheques. Ask for receipts for each payment you make.

 

In some situations creditors can seize your property by contacting the civil enforcement agency. To do this, a judgement is not required. The most common situation
where this occurs is when there is a debt of rent owed to the landlord.

 

5. Where can I go for help?

Credit Counselling Services of Alberta assists with assessment of your debt, information on how to deal with creditors and general information on how to deal with your debt.

 

Alberta Government Services can assist with information on what legal steps creditors can take to collect debts.

^TOP^

 What Can Happen If You Do Not Pay Your Debts

1. Did you secure the transaction?

If you have secured a debt it means that you have used another possession as collateral and promised to give this to the creditor if you do not pay the debt.
When you promise property as security this is usually registered in the Personal Property Registry. Other creditors can check the registry to see what is registered against your name.

 

If you do not make your payments as you had agreed to do, the creditor can take the security. If the property you have put up as security is not worth enough
to cover the debt, the creditor can sue for any difference as well as any legal costs and interest.

 

Before the creditor can seize the property that has been secured they have to prove that they have made reasonable efforts to collect the money owed.
Once they have proven this they will contact a civil enforcement agency to collect the property. You will be given 20 days notice before the agency can sell
your property. You can get your property back but you will need to pay all arrears and any administrative costs that were incurred by the agency.
The costs you will need to pay will be listed on the notice that is provided. If you do not pay they have a right to sell the property.

 

2. Did I buy the property under a conditional sales contract?

If you have bought items under a conditional sales contract the creditor owns the goods until you have paid for them in full. The goods themselves are the Security,
you do not put up another item as the security. If you do not make the payments as agreed to in the contract the creditor can seize the goods or sue you in order to
get a judgement for the amount you owe.

 

An example of this is the sale of a car. Even though you are in possession of the car, you are not the sole owner of it until you make the final payment. If you do not make
your payments the dealer can seize the car which is the security.

 

3. What if the transaction was unsecured?

In a situation where you have not promised security to the creditor but you still get credit from them, you have an unsecured credit agreement. Examples of this are credit
cards and utility bills. If you do not pay bills owed to an unsecured creditor they can sue you.

In cases where it is a utility bill, they will likely cut off the services and then pursue legal action against you. If you want to have the service reconnected you will need to pay
any outstanding debt and any other administrative fees that are owed.

 

4. What happens when a creditor sues you?

If the creditor is trying to recover $25,000 or less from you, often the case will be heard in the Civil Division of the Provincial Court. You will be served with a civil claim either
in person or by registered mail. The civil claim will advise you of who is suing you, the reasons for the claim and how much the claim is for.

If you ignore the claim a judgement will automatically be filed against you and you will not have a chance to defend yourself against the claim. Included with the claim should be a
Dispute Note. In order to dispute the claim you will need to fill this out and return it to the court. If a dispute note is not included you can request one from the courts. Once you have
filed this the court will contact you to advise of dates for mediation (if applicable) and trial. You have 20 days to file the dispute note.

 

Alternatively, you may be able to negotiate a settlement with the creditor even though they have filed a claim against you. You can try to contact the creditor and work out an
arrangement for payment.

 

If you do not dispute the fact that you owe the money it is also possible to go to court with the documents and pay the amount owing plus any related costs. Ensure that you
get a receipt for the transaction. Payment can be made by cash, certified cheque or money order.

 

If the creditor is trying to recover more than $25,000 then the claim will be filed in the Court of Queen’s Bench. You will be notified of the action by a Statement of Claim.
You will have 15 days to respond to the claim; either by a statement of defense or a demand of notice. Because these matters are often very complicated most people will hire a lawyer.
Students are not able to represent people who are dealing with matters in the Court of Queen’s Bench, and as such Student Legal Services of Edmonton would only be able to provide
you with basic information and would suggest you speak to a lawyer about the matter.

 

5. What is a judgement?

A judgement is the decision that is made by the courts with respect to the claim that has been filed. If the creditor is successful in court with their claim against you, the court will issue
a judgement that sets out the details of what the court’s decision was. If there is a judgement against you it will show on your credit file. Even if you pay, it will stay on your record for 7 years.

 

The creditor, once they have a judgement for payment from you, has several options open to them to collect. They can register a writ of enforcement to seize property or to garnishee
your wages or bank accounts.

 

6. What is a writ and what items can and cannot be seized?

The Court of Queen’s Bench issues writs of enforcement and then registers the writ with the Personal Property Registry. If there is more than one judgement against you, there can be
multiple writs registered. If one creditor seizes property and sells it or garnishes wages or a bank account, all of the creditors with judgements will receive a share of the money.

 

In cases where you own land or property the writ can be registered in the Land Titles Office against the title of that land or property. If there is a sale or a request for a new mortgage
you may have difficulties trying to remortgage or sell the property until the judgement is paid.

 

It is not the creditor that seizes property under a writ of enforcement, it is a civil enforcement agency that is hired to do so. Before the seizure occurs, you will be given a notice of seizure,
a notice of objection and an information for debtor form. These will either be posted on your door or given to you personally. The bailiff may take the property at this time or advise you that
they will be seizing it and are not to sell, remove or damage the property.

 

You have 15 days to give a notice of objection once you have received the notice of seizure. In the notice, you will give the reasons for your objection and subsequently, a hearing date will be
set for a judge to decide if the creditor is entitled to take the property. If you do not file a notice of objection, the property can be sold and the money obtained for it will be forwarded to the creditor.

 

The civil enforcement agency does not have the right to take anything you own; there are certain exceptions. These include household furnishings and appliances worth up to $4,000, one motor
vehicle with a value of up to $5,000, tools required for your trade up to a value of $10,000 and personal property that you require in order for you to earn your livelihood up to a value of $10,000.
If the creditor is a landlord the exemption for household furnishings and appliances is different and is only up to a value of $1,000.

 

7. What is garnishment?

Another way the money owed in a judgement can be collected is by garnishment. This is a legal procedure where the creditor applies to the courts to take money from such places as your bank
account, your pay cheque or from those who owe you money. The creditor will file a writ of enforcement in the Court of Queen’s Bench who will supply a garnishee summons that is then
delivered to your bank or your employer.

 

Wages or the money in your account can be legally seized but only up to the amount of the judgement debt and costs. If you do not have enough money to cover the debt, the creditor can
continue to garnishee your accounts and/or wages until the judgement is paid in full. A garnishee summons is effective for one year. If the money has not been collected the summons can be
renewed. You will not receive advance notice of garnishment. A copy of the summons will be provided to you by your employer, bank or the creditor within 15 days.

 

If the creditor chooses to garnish wages they will not take your entire pay cheque. You are allowed to keep enough to cover basic expenses. The exemptions are dependent on each individual
situation - they will take into account how many children there are and what your income is. The minimum exemption for a person with no dependants is $800 net per month and the maximum is
$2,400 net per month. These amounts increase by $200 for each dependant. If the debt owed is for unpaid child support or alimony under a court order the rules are different. In order to get
more information about garnishment in these situations call the Alberta Justice Maintenance Enforcement Program.

 

If the creditor chooses to garnishee your bank account, they are allowed to take the full amount that is owed if the funds are available. If you do not have enough to cover the whole debt,
the creditor is still able to take all of the money that is in the account and they are not required to leave anything for you. If your pay cheques are deposited directly into your account all of
this can be garnisheed because it is considered a bank deposit. The only exception to this are payments under the Social Development Act, such as Social Services Aid payments, handicap
benefits under the Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped Act or widow’s pensions under the Widows’ Pension Act as long as these payments are deposited into a separate account
and not mixed with any other money. Joint bank accounts can be garnisheed.

 

If you believe that the garnishment was calculated incorrectly you can file an objection with the Court of Queen’s Bench. You must do so in the same district as the original summons was filed.
You will likely need help from a lawyer in order to proceed with an objection. Also, because the money is paid by your bank or employer to the courts and then out to the creditor it is a good idea
to file your objection as soon as possible before the money is paid to the creditor.

 

8. What happens once I have paid?

Once you have completely paid the judgement it should be discharged. This means that it will be removed from the records at the Court of Queen’s Bench and the Personal Property Registry and
shows that you no longer owe the debt. Usually the creditor does this but you will want to check and make sure it is done so there are no problems in the future. You can also advise the credit
agencies so that it is documented on your credit file that you have paid the debt in full.

 

9. Where can I get legal help for my debts?

Credit Counselling Services of Alberta assists with assessment of your debt, information on how to deal with creditors and general information on how to deal with your debt.

 

Alberta Government Services can assist with information on what legal steps creditors can take to collect debts.

^TOP^

How Can Student Legal Services Help With Credit Issues?

Student Legal Services of Edmonton offers information to those who have questions about legal issues. Generally, SLS can try to help you figure out exactly what the issue is. We can give you information on
different things you can do. If your situation is complex, we may be able to act on your behalf as your agent, depending on your financial situation. Students at SLS are not able to act on your behalf in matters
in the Court of Queen’s Bench but we may be able to give you information or refer you to another agency that can help.

Consumer Services Branch 780 427-4088, 1-877-427-4088
Alberta Justice Maintenance Enforcement Program 780 422-5555
Alberta Motor Vehicle Industry Council 780 466-1140
- Investigations 1-877-979-8100
Credit Counselling Services of Alberta 780 423-5265, 1-888-294-0076
Equifax Canada 1-800-465-7166
Lawyer Referral Service 1-800-661-1095
Northern Credit Bureaus 1-800-532-8784
TransUnion of Canada 780 429-1566, 1-800-663-9980
Student Legal Services Civil - 780 492-8244


How Can You Help
1. Share this website on your facebook and all social media make collection agency's stop calling: http://www.myskipassist.com/makecollectionagencysstopcalling.php
2. Share this website with your emails simply copy and pase the following link:
http://www.myskipassist.com/makecollectionagencysstopcalling.php
3. If you think someone you know is being harrased, intimidated or bullyed in any other way. Help them send
do not call letter.
4. Help them file a ministry complaint by clicking the province they live in and sending in the complaint form.
5. If you are financialy able to make a donation to our cause you can feel good knowing the donation money is going to good use helping us end
collection agency bullying and harrasment for good. To make a donation please click the button below.

You can also support us by purchasing one of the offers listed below, this way you can get something for youself and at the same time make a donation. We appriciate any help no matter how small. We can also mention your name or buisness name on our donation page, we would really like to have some reputible credit councilleers and trustee's listed as
well or any other person or buisness that would like to donate. If you don't want to be listed that is fine too.

 

Debt collectors Information, debt collector is a term for a licensed bill collector and debtor is term for person in debt which is secured or unsecured debt

get out of debt, how can you be debt free

credit card debt and all other unsecured debt


Powered by 4GoodHosting

Find People, Find Phone Numbers, Find Addresses, Find Buisnesses, Your #1 Trace tool & collection agency guide My skip assistPeople Finding websitesFinding people using google, google tricks, Consumer protection websites canadaMake Collection Agency's Stop Calling YouCollection agency rules AlbertaCollection Agency Rules British ColumbiaCollection Agency Rules SaskatchewanCollection agency rules ManitobaCollection Agency Rules OntarioCollection Agency Rules QuebecQUEBEC CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT PAGE 2Collection Agency Rules PEICollection Agency Rules Newfoundland & LabradorCollection agency rules NunavutCollection Agency Rules Northwest territoriesCollection agency rules in Yukon TerritoriesGovernment Of Canada Everything You need to know about credit Page 1Government Of Canada Everything you need to know about credit Page 2Goverment of canada everything you need to know about credit page 3United States Collection Agency RulesCollection agency rules state of AlabamaCollection Agency Rules AlaskaVIDEO PAGE - VIDEO GUIDE TO STOPPING COLLECTOR CALLS YOUR CREDIT AND MOREHow to file a collection agency complaint and all the collection agency rules. All your options from bankrupcy to credit counsellors and everything inbetweenList of all trustees in CanadaCanadian Consumer Handbook Collection AgenciesCanadian Consumer Handbook ContractsCanadian Consumer Handbook Credit ReportingCanadian Consumer Handbook Debit Card FraudCanadian Consumer Handbook DebtCanadian Consumer Handbook Financial ServicesCanadian Consumer Handbook MortgagesCanadian Consumer Handbook Payday LendingBuild Your Buying Skills From OCASpending Smarter Tools from OCATake Charge of Your Debt from OCACellphones from OCALearn About the Retail Market from OCAProtect Your Privacy from OCAGet a Mortgage, Mortgage Refinanace, Second Mortgage, Equity LoanMortgage Basics- What you need to knowHow credit effects your mortgageGuestbookALL Collection Agency's in Canada page 1ALL Collection Agency's in Canada Page 2ALL Collection Agencys in Canada page 3ALL Collection Agency's in Canada Page 4ALL Collection Agency's in Canada Page 5